Thanking the Moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival

Thanking the Moon
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Public transportation will be busier than usual. The day is also a public holiday in Sri Lanka , as are all full-moon days. What's all the hype? Chinese mooncakes are round, baked, palmsize cakes eaten and gifted during the Chinese Moon Festival — or anytime a rich delicacy is in order. They're a popular gift, often given in decorative boxes to clients, family members, and important people.

Mooncakes are made with egg yolks and come with a variety of fillings; the most popular are made from bean paste, lotus seeds, fruits, and sometimes even meat. The cakes are typically round to symbolize the full moon, although some are square. Many are skillfully decorated. Writing or patterns on top tell of good fortunes to come. Regional variations abound. The boxes for mooncakes are often as beautiful as the cakes inside, making them an attractive gift. Many mooncakes are sweet but not all. Some are savory. Artisans push the shock factor with new creations each year.

Fillings such as sambal, durian, salted duck eggs, and gold flakes up intrigue and the price for a box. Despite the small size, Chinese mooncakes are often prepared with lard or shortening and are quite "heavy. Many people choose to cut mooncakes into wedges or quarters to share them with friends over tea. Given the difficulty of making artisan mooncakes and the far-flung fillings involved, some are surprisingly expensive!

Fillings that made a big splash in the past include unexpected options such as chicken floss, foie gras , ice cream, coffee, and others. One pricey mooncake variant contains shark fin — an unsustainable option. Around 11, sharks die per hour roughly three per second , mostly due to finning practices driven by demand in Asia.

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The environmental impact is certainly not worth the made-up health benefits — shark fin contains concentrated levels of mercury! Some mooncakes share the same legacy as fruitcakes in the U. You probably won't have any trouble finding mooncakes on sale weeks before the actual festival begins. Mooncakes will be available in every shop and restaurant. Hotels will have their own in-house creations on display. Even fast food and ice cream chains get in on the action during the festival.

If you plan to give mooncakes that are wrapped or boxed, keep in mind that gift-giving etiquette differs in Asia from the West. Don't expect the recipient to immediately tear into a gift in front of you. As with all practices so old, a lot of legends developed over the years; it becomes difficult to understand the original traditions. Most stories are based on the idea that the goddess Chang'e lives on the moon; however, tales of how she got there diverge widely.

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One story suggests that the moon goddess was the wife of a legendary archer who was ordered to shoot down all but one of the suns in the sky. That's why we only have one sun. After accomplishing the task, he was given an immortality pill as a reward. His wife found and took the pill instead, then later flew to the moon where she lives now. Another Chinese Moon Festival legend states that paper messages inside of mooncakes were used as a way to organize the exact date of a coup against the ruling Mongols during the Yuan Dynasty.

The Mongols were overthrown on the night of the Moon Festival. For a book that expresses itself in only a single line of text per page, Thanking the Moon has a lot of quality story to tell. Much of it is told through illustrations that do wonders in setting the mood, and give us between-the-lines insight into the real importance behind the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival. One doesn't have to believe in making supplication to the goddess of the moon to be able to appreciate the positive effect of setting aside a special day to remind us to give thanks for the bles For a book that expresses itself in only a single line of text per page, Thanking the Moon has a lot of quality story to tell.

One doesn't have to believe in making supplication to the goddess of the moon to be able to appreciate the positive effect of setting aside a special day to remind us to give thanks for the blessings in our lives, and to not ever forget the good things we do have because we're so focused on what we're still hoping to gain. The whole family gets into the act of celebrating on the night of the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival, setting up traditional decorations and putting out the food for the party.

It's more than just a family event, though; it's a community-wide effort to promote an attitude of thankfulness and the unity that comes from many people all remembering their shared blessings together. I can't recall having ever even heard of the festival before reading this book, but Grace Lin's tender portrait of the holiday celebration provides me with ample reason to wish that I could take part in a Mid-Autumn Moon Festival, to experience that kind of closeness of community.

For readers who are interested in learning a bit more about the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival, there's an author's note at the end of the book that gives a more in-depth explanation. In my mind, Grace Lin perfectly sums up the book and its message in the final line of this section, saying "The Mid-Autumn Festival remains a beloved celebration and, along with the Lunar New Year, is one of the most important holidays of the year. Just as the moon always returns to its fullness, the festival continues to reunite families and inspire peace and gratitude. Dec 01, Ashley Steele rated it it was amazing.

Publisher Description

Thanking the Moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival [Grace Lin] on loxyrykudaje.tk *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This simple, young, and. Editorial Reviews. From School Library Journal. PreS-Gr 3–In the style of Bringing in the New Year (Knopf, ), Lin fashions a child-friendly introduction to the.

An Asian-American girl along with her parents and two sisters are getting things together to celebrate the mid-autumn moon festival that evening. The girl talks about different jobs each family has to set up for their celebration filled with Asian influenced foods and decorations such as lanterns and moon cakes.

She talks about spending time with her family and enjoying celebrating the harvest moon with her family. The back two pages of the book goes into more detail about the Moon Festival. The An Asian-American girl along with her parents and two sisters are getting things together to celebrate the mid-autumn moon festival that evening.

The Asian culture celebrates the moon and thanks it for their harvest it will bring in. The culture celebrates the night around Thanksgiving and children are allowed to stay up during the night to take part in the festivities. Some towns will have parades or others will celebrate with close family members. I really enjoyed this book because I never knew the Asian culture thanks the moon for its bringing of harvest. The traditional celebration seems fun to do for little children because they are able to stay up way past bed time: what kid would not want to do that?

I really like the colors of the pictures; the background was a dark blue representing the night and the people were dressed in lighter colors but in t-shirts and jeans-nothing uncommon for Americans. I would recommend this book to a kindergartener wanting to learn about different cultures or beginning to read.

Each page only had one sentence which seems great to start off reading for young children and with the colorful pages it could help them keep focused. Jul 26, Susan rated it really liked it Shelves: , storybook. A beautiful book, literally and figuratively. I appreciated how it conveys information about the moon festival in a simple, storybook fashion; the reader is able to learn a lot about the traditions without being hammered over the head by it.

At the same time, there are more details at the end for those wanting to look them up. The illustrations are lovely literally beautiful. They too contain a great deal of information allowing the text to be simple and supportive, again supporting learning a A beautiful book, literally and figuratively. They too contain a great deal of information allowing the text to be simple and supportive, again supporting learning about the traditions without being pedantic.

Finally, I really enjoyed that the young girl, her sisters, and her parents each had 'jobs' and worked together to enact their traditions. Feb 22, Sarah Sammis rated it really liked it Shelves: read-in , read-in-college , borrowed. According to the U. Census, the county I live in is roughly one third Asian.

In that third, roughly of that is Chinese. This book is about the preparations leading up to Mid-Autumn Moon festival, and then the festival itself.

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Finally, I really enjoyed that the young girl, her sisters, and her parents each had 'jobs' and worked together to enact their traditions. There are things to collect and prepare: pomelos, tea, mooncakes and paper lanterns. I love the simple text with one sentence per page. It is just an introduction to the traditions that go along with the holiday. Thanks for letting us know! Readers also enjoyed. Fun even if you didn't know what the holiday was about--and you can read an explanation in an afterward.

Each family member has a job to do to get ready. There are things to collect and prepare: pomelos, tea, mooncakes and paper lanterns. Grace Lin uses patt According to the U. Grace Lin uses patterns in her colorful artwork that mimic the beautiful patterns you'd find in Chinese textiles. But the families that go to celebrate the festival at the park show the wide diversity of the Chinese-American families. Nov 18, Krista the Krazy Kataloguer rated it really liked it Shelves: read-childrens-books , read-goodreads-authors , read-local-authors , read-holidays.

9 Children’s Books about the Chinese Mid-Autumn Moon Festival

The simple text in this story describes how a Chinese family celebrates the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival. Sounds like fun to me! Grace Lin's colorful illustrations of the food made my mouth water, especially the moon cakes, which a friend of mine used to send me from New Jersey--haven't had any that good since.

I've never had a pomelo either, which also looked yummy. Are they sold in the U. The whole idea of an evening picnic under the full moon, with paper lanterns hanging about, appeals to me. At the end of the book Lin supplies further details of the origins and traditions of the moon festival. Perhaps I will have my own in my back yard this fall Highly recommended! Jun 07, EDUC rated it really liked it.

This story follows a young girl and her family who are setting up a traditional picnic to celebrate. It is just an introduction to the traditions that go along with the holiday. Throughout the book, it uses a few cultural words jei jei, baba, moon cakes, pomelos, etc. At the end of the book, the author ends the narration by the young girl and includes factual information to Review by Danielle Seyler A simple story that just begins to delve into the Chinese holiday, the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival.

At the end of the book, the author ends the narration by the young girl and includes factual information to help the reader learn more. This is a great way for a child to be introduced to other traditions and continue researching about the holiday to find out more. Dec 27, Irene McHugh rated it it was amazing Shelves: children , illustrated , fiction , library , print. Found this book on the shelf at the library.

I love how she illustrated the night sky in blue with light gray swirls everywhere. The Chinese family walks out into the field to celebrate the Moon Festival with their nighttime picnic and lanterns. This story beautifully illustrates all of the steps this family takes to honor the moon who watches over everyone, and send her their secret wishes. At the end of the st Found this book on the shelf at the library.

Thanking the Moon

At the end of the story, there's a short summary of the history of the Mid-Autumn Festival. Wonderful book to read with children to help them appreciate diverse customs. Nov 05, Christy Baker rated it really liked it Shelves: juvenile-fiction. A two page end-section in more adult language provides slightly more information apart from the main children's stories. I've seen some of Grace Lin's other storybooks and find her art style very approachable and kid-friendly. I especially liked the scenes of pomelos with the children playing with the peels and lanterns of different colors and designs.

Oct 12, Tricia rated it liked it. I enjoy Grace Lin's books and this title is no exception. Beautifully illustrated with simple text, this book shows the steps taken by a family celebrating the mid-autumn moon festival. Small criticism: in the story there is no explanation about the holiday It may have been nice to have one line within the short and simple text about the purpose incorporated in the story. Nov 22, Becky B rated it really liked it Shelves: asian-lit-setting-characters , holiday-picture-books , picture-books.

The back of the book explains the traditions and symbolism of the food. I've lived in Asia for over a decade but never had the Lunar Festival explained from a Chinese perspective I know more about the Korean traditions It helps me better understand the moon cakes that appear. And Grace Lin's illustrations are delightful. Sep 24, Jeanne Mcpeak rated it really liked it. With very simple text this appealing book tells about a Chinese American family who arecelebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival.

Illustrations are beautiful with vivid color and add to the text. I like that there is a more in-depth description of this holiday that is celebrated by many Asian families at the back of the book.

Thanking the Moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival

Feb 12, Marta Boksenbaum rated it liked it Shelves: childrens-lit. The bright colors against the navy blue sky make the illustrations cheerful, and the text is simple but lyrical. The afterword which describes the festival is great context for the text, and overall is a lovely book. A compact story describing the events and reasons for the Chinese Moon Festival.

It is a time to give thanks for a good year and to celebrate with family. Author's note gives us a more detailed description of the festival. Nov 25, Karen rated it liked it Shelves: jacob , mom , ellie. Checked out this book from the library along with other Thanksgiving books. This read lead to great discussions about how a missionary could relate to the Chinese people and bring the gospel to them.

Ellie said she would tell them that the moon they cherish so much was created by God and go from there Sep 01, Whirl Girl rated it really liked it Shelves: china. This was our second book about the Mid-Autumn Festival. It was a great compliment to Lin Yi's Lantern.

Thanking the Moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival

It has a simpler story, showing a family celebrating with traditional foods and activities at an evening picnic. The illustrations are colorful and clear, and give a nice sense of participating in the festival. Feb 03, AP rated it it was ok Shelves: children-s-books. We're usually big fans of Ms. Lin's work, but somehow a bit of the usual spark in her artwork is missing from this book. The colors look more muted, perhaps this is due to the printers? Otherwise a very capable, lovely introduction to the Moon Festival, one of the three major Chinese holidays.

Oct 12, Diana rated it really liked it Shelves: childrens-book. So, my daughter and I read this last night and I actually enjoyed it. I never knew what the Chinese Thanksgiving consisted of and it was great to learn about that in this colorful book. I could see this in a classroom library. Sep 09, Meg McGregor rated it liked it Shelves: holiday-reads , read-to-lexi.

Thanking the Moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival by Grace Lin

Each member of a loving family contribute to the celebration of the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival. Informative text at the end gives more details and is an interesting read for the older child or adult. Aug 16, Matthew rated it liked it. Much the same as her Dim Sum for Everyone! At the end is a two-page informational text on the history of the holiday. Nov 18, The Library Lady rated it really liked it Shelves: picture-books. Another book in Lin's well done series about a Chinese-American family celebrating their traditions, this time the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Fun even if you didn't know what the holiday was about--and you can read an explanation in an afterward.